Tag Archives: madagascar periwinkle

Life without the Madagascar Periwinkle

It feels a bit strange to be back at Great Ormond Street after 3 months away. Henry has continued to have the weekly blood tests but there has not been much to report. This is of course a wonderful thing.

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That’s not to say things have been event free. There was a vomiting bug which a year ago would have wound us up nicely. But Henry seemed to recover from it faster than many of his classmates and it didn’t send us into hospital.

And then there was an allergy scare in March. The doctors were worried about the low levels of oxygen in his blood. We thought he might have been allergic to one of his chemotherapies. That would have been highly unusual and bad news. Henry is getting less than the normal treatment because of the clinical trial he’s in. With a disruption to the chemotherapy, we could have been back onto the normal protocol which is much harder. That would have meant monthly vincristine and its steroid henchman dexamethasone.

Vincristine comes from the Periwinkle

The periwinkle is the source of vincristine’s oomph.

Although it’s a drug derived from the rather lovely periwinkle, vincristine’s side effects are not so charming – hair loss, muscle and joint pain, nausea.

The allergic response was to a drug he takes each week to prevent a type of pneumonia that can strike patients with compromised immune systems. The drug, Dapsone, is usually used to treat leprosy… and it did something his red blood cells were not keen on. So now Henry is back on his old foe Septrin – which he hates. But by giving it to him in crushed tablets and calling it by its compound name co-trimoxazole we’re now getting it down him.

In fact the medicine refusal has largely disappeared.

The most dramatic change has been on Henry’s hair. This has come back beautifully blond and continues to spiral out of control – to his annoyance and our delight.

We’ve been very poor bloggers. It must be 8 or 9 months since we last posted. But it is a sign that things can return to a normality that we post so infrequently.

Today Henry is in for a general anaesthetic so they can put methotrexate into his spine. I was thinking yesterday that we were getting used to this. But that’s not possible. While Henry is taking it in his stride, the prospect makes me feel distinctly queasy. Celia and I are not clasping each other for reassurance as we did when he was first put under. But there’s nothing normal about it.

2 July 2014