Tag Archives: swimming

Is this discrimination against a cancer patient and his family? It feels like it.

Don't judge a book by its cover

Don’t judge a book by its cover

*UPDATE – this has now been resolved with profuse apologies from the hotel*

Here we report on the Iberostar Grand Hotel Mencey in Tenerife.

This morning this hotel reduced Henry to tears. That’s not easy to do. He has had needles thrust in his chest, regular injections in his spine, he has had high levels of vein-dissolving chemotherapy, he has had blood and plasma transfusions, he has had his hair burnt out by his medicine. He has had disfiguring steroids that have swollen his face and body and others that have made him unable to run, sometimes even to walk. He has fought all this with as much patience as he can muster, which is a lot. He has not faced meanness until today. It was the meanness that brought on the tears.

Today he tried to go for a swim with his brother in our posh hotel – the Iberostar Grand Hotel Mencey. He’s a guest here. His bed did not come cheap. But we’ve had a very hard year and this is Henry’s first big holiday since he was hospitalised on New Year’s Eve 2012. The hotel decided we could not. Henry would be allowed on his own but not with his brother or both his parents.

Because of his leukaemia, Henry has little tolerance to the sun. There is an indoor pool, and an outdoor pool that has no shade at all. We chose this hotel because it would give us options – to avoid the heat of the sun when necessary.

Iberostar Mencey's unshaded outdoor pool

Iberostar Mencey’s unshaded outdoor pool

But when we asked for a short swim in the indoor pool, as it is not safe for Henry to swim too long in the direct sun, we were told the indoor pool was for adults only (a fact not made clear on the website). The pool is empty much of the time. Even though it’s a 5-star hotel the staff were totally inflexible. Henry’s kindly Uncle G, who has contacts in the hotel trade, made some requests behind the scenes and we received a call from reception and told our use of the indoor pool would be ‘no problem’.

Family permission withdrawn

Family permission withdrawn. Looking into the indoor pool.

We had a 20 minute swim and the boys were quiet and well-behaved. Two days later we returned to the indoor pool and our permission to swim as a family had been withdrawn. Apparently a fellow-guest had complained. The hotel manager said he had explained to this guest that the hotel had made an exception for us because our child has cancer, but the guest had said that this was not her problem – it was ours.

The hotel decided to prioritise this complainant’s wishes over ours.

We have, overall, been lucky on our travels when we have needed some flexibility. This is one of the few things that helps you through the grinding misery of childhood cancer. The Grand Hotel Mencey – one of the jewels of Iberostar’s chain – has been the exception. They have shown us meanness and shown our children that, in some establishments, intolerance is rewarded. I’m not sure this would have been legal in the UK, Iberostar insists that in Spain it’s fine.

It has tarnished our longed-for holiday that we have stretched ourselves to give the boys.

Advertisements